Archeological Team Discovers Previously Unknown Jewish Village

News and Events
Registration
First Name:
Last Name:
Email:  
Phone:
Interested In
select
Confirm receipt of advertisements
Insert your phone and we shall return to you shortly
 
1800-20-90-20

Archeological Team Discovers Previously Unknown Jewish Village

Press Release
August 4 2013


Dr. Mordehai Aviam from the Institute for Galileean Archeology, Students from the Land of Israel Studies Department of the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, and Other Mission Partners
Discover Remains of Unknown Jewish Village and Synagogue near Tzippori


An American-Israeli archeological team, led by Dr. Mordehai Aviam from the Institute for Galileean Archeology, of the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, Dr. James Strange from the Samford University, Alabama, Dr. David Fiensy Leigh from the Kentucky Christian University, students from the Land of Israel Studies Department of the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, and students and volunteers from the United States, unearthed remains of the Jewish village of Sichin at the northern edge of the Tzippori National Park in the Galilee.




Jewish historian Josephus mentions the village of Sichin as one of the first Jewish communities in the Galilee during the Second Temple Era and later, in the time of the Talmud, as a village of Jewish potters near Tzippori. The excavations revealed the first evidence of the existence of a magnificent synagogue, as well as many other finds that corroborate the conclusions of previous researchers about the extensive manufacture of clay vessels of various types at this village.

Dr. Mordehai Aviam from the Institute for Galileean Archeology, of the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee, said that: “it was a great surprise for us, the excavators, to discover seven stone molds for preparing decorated clay oil lamps. One of the lamp fragments manufactured at the site is decorated with a menorah (candelabra) with lulavs (ceremonial palm fronds) next to it. According to the clay vessels finds, it appears that the settlement was abandoned in the fourth century CE, apparently following the earthquake which occurred in 363, or possibly as a result of the Gallus revolt which took place in 351, which was centered at Tzippori. The excavations will continue for the coming years, and will try to unearth the synagogue, manufacturing equipment and residential buildings.”

Samford Archaeological Dig in Israel Uncovers Unfamiliar Jewish Village








For further information: Sharon Sahar, spokesperson and public relations, Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee: 054-6769356